Two FL polls show double-digit lead for Gov. Ron DeSantis over Democrat Charlie Crist

The two political polls were conducted before the gubernatorial debate between DeSantis and Crist on Monday

By: - October 26, 2022 4:22 pm

At the Leon County Courthouse, 2020 voters could vote early in person or by dropping their ballots in a drop box. Credit: Diane Rado

With the 2022 general election two weeks away, Gov. Ron DeSantis holds a double-digit lead over Charlie Crist, according to statewide surveys of likely voters in Florida released Wednesday.

However, the two political polls were conducted before the gubernatorial debate between DeSantis and Crist that took place Monday.

That means favorability ratings could change for each candidate following the debate where both of them took jabs at each other over issues surrounding abortion rights, education, immigration and other topics.

In the gubernatorial election in Florida, a Florida Chamber of Commerce poll found that 53 percent of those surveyed supported the reelection of GOP Gov. DeSantis, while 42 percent favored Crist, a Democrat who served as a former GOP Florida governor, Attorney General and Education Commissioner, as well as a Democrat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

The Republican governor also held a lead among Hispanic voters, with 59 percent supporting DeSantis and 37 percent in favor of Crist, the poll found. In the survey, top issues facing Floridians included inflation, gas prices, the economy, education, and immigration.

The Florida Chamber of Commerce’s poll included interviews of 601 likely voters from October 13-23. The poll surveyed 244 Democrats, 250 Republicans and 107 “others.”

And in a September poll by Mason-Dixon Polling and Strategy, DeSantis held an 11-percentage point lead over his Democratic challenger Crist, with 52 percent in favor of DeSantis and 41 percent in favor of Crist.

Mark Wilson, president and CEO of the Florida Chamber of Commerce, said in a written statement Wednesday:

“Florida’s economics, demographics and politics continue changing. This new Florida Chamber poll shows likely Florida voters are more confident in Florida than in the nation. With the 2022 General Election two weeks away, it is essential to elect pro-jobs candidates to make sure the right things keep happening in Florida as we grow from the 16th to the 10th largest global economy by 2030.”

Meanwhile, another poll conducted by a progressive organization found that Crist trails DeSantis by even more percentage points. DeSantis, a Republican seeking reelection, led his Democratic opponent Crist by 12 percentage points, in the poll conducted by Data for Progress.

That poll involved a survey of 1,251 likely voters in Florida conducted from Oct. 19-23.

Overall, 54 percent of those surveyed said they’d choose DeSantis if the election for governor in Florida “was held tomorrow.” And 42 percent of respondents favored Crist.

However, Crist garnered more support than DeSantis from African American voters in the survey. Overall, 60 percent of respondents said they favor Crist for governor, compared to only 30 percent who said they favor DeSantis.

As for the U.S. Senate race in Florida, Sen. Marco Rubio leads U.S. Rep. Val Demings by seven percentage points in the Data for Progress poll, with 51 percent of respondents in favor of incumbent GOP Sen. Rubio, while 44 percent in favor of Demings.

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Issac Morgan
Issac Morgan

Issac Morgan is a 2009 graduate of Florida A&M University's School of Journalism, and a proud native of Tallahassee. He has covered city council and community events at the Gadsden County Times, worked as a sports news assistant at the Tallahassee Democrat, a communications specialist for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and as a proofreader at the Florida Law Weekly.

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